Axis 2. New forms of political discourse, new spaces of politicization?

This axis is about the online “political discourse” in its diversity and within multiple digital spaces (websites, blogs, social networks, etc.) whether they are managed or not by institutions.
On one side, institutions and politicians build new online practices that lead to reconsidering how the contents of public actions initiated by local, national or international authorities spread. How do such practices participate in the transformation of political discourse? How do they act on the discussions between politicians and citizens or between citizens themselves, and on the unequal sharing of powers and knowledge among them? What does it show about the ranges and the forms of contemporary public and political communication? On the other side, politics have now entered digital social spaces, both through politicians and individuals who produce and share various contents. How do digital social networks contribute to keeping citizens informed, to their politicization, or to the constitution of an online “public”?
More generally, to what extent are these evolutions in public and political communication transforming political participation?

Chair : Norbert KERSTING (Munster University, Germany)

Speakers :
Julien BOYADJIAN (CEPEL, Université Montpellier 1, France) : Twitter, a new gauge of public opinion?
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Coralie LE CAROFF (CARISM, Université Paris 2 Panthéon- Assas, France) : The sociopolitical uses of Facebook : a gender perspective.
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Discussant : Gersende BLANCHARD (Université Lille 3, France)

Speakers :
Patrícia DIAS DA SILVA (ESCS-IPL, School of Communication and Media Studies, Lisboa Polytechnic Institute, Portugal) : Joining the online video conversation? Discourse and practices of European political institutions and politicians on YouTube.
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Gonen DORI-HACOHEN and Nimrod SHAVIT (Department of Communication, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, US) : The discursive and cultural meanings of Israeli tokbek (talk-back – online commenting) and their relevance to the online democratic public sphere.
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Tim HIGHFIELD (Queensland University of Technology, Australia) : Twitter and Australian political debates.
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Discussant : Scott WRIGHT (Leicester University, United Kingdom)